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Full text of "Entre Nous 1913"

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SAMFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 







153016 



Dedication 

THE year 1913 had a good beginning, for it was ushered 
in with the coming of a wise and good man to become 

the President of Howard College. He gave up his high 
position among Southern Baptist ministers, together with all 
his aspirations along the line of his chosen field for life-long 
endeavor, and came to us, because he heard a call of duty that 
was mandatory and saw the vision of Howard College at the 
very foundation of all the Baptist interests in Alabama. 

We have already learned that he is a man of action, find- 
ing out what should be done and doing it, and having already 
done his deeds before talking about them. 

In token of our trust in him and our belief that in his 
coming a new day has dawned for Howard College, we, the 
Board of Editors of ENTRE-NOUS, '13, respectfully dedicate 
this annual to 

5Pr, James 4W- ^htlbnxnt 



Charles Bowdon Kingry 

Curtis Bush Hasty . 
William Hugh McCary 
Hiram Bruister Gilmer 
Thomas Elihu Hand 
James Franklin Isbell . 
William Richard Rigell 
William Campbell Blake 
James Calvin Stivender 



Editor-in-Chief and Fra- 
ternities 
Business Manager 
Asst. Business Manager 
Class Editor 
Societies 
Military 
Jokes 

Organizations 
Athletics 



Contributors 

ARTISTS 

Miss Haywood Molton Birmingham, Ala. 

Mr. Malcolm Dabney Birmingham, Ala. 

LITERARY 

Prof. P. P. Burns Howard College 

Prof. E. M. Haggard Howard College 

Miss \.\x (i. Wai.siii: Birmingham, Ala. 

Miss Btrmaii Dale Hilliard .... Birmingham, Ala. 



Greeting: 



> ^^^-^HE only reward desired by the Editors for their efforts expended 
■ C j in publishing this humble book is a favorable reception by you. 
^^^^ We did not bind this book in black because we are sad. Our 
labors are over and our hearts are light. If you will greet Entre-Nous, 
'13, with a smile, our joy will be complete. It may be quite a task to 
peruse these pages to the end, but, for the sake of humanity and in the 
strength of summoned-up courage, lick your thumb and proceed. 

We wish to express our sincere gratitude to our kind contributors 
and benevolent critics. 



Commencement, 1913 

Baccalaureate Sermon, by Rev. Rufus \V. Weaver, Th.D., I). I)., Sun- 
day, I I :oo A. M., May 25th. 

Sermon to Graduates of Normal Training Course of Bible School, by Rev. 
Rufus \Y. Weaver, Sunday, 8:00 P. M., May 25th. 

Last Chapel Exercise and Roll Call, Monday. 9:30 .\. M., May 26th. 

Sophomore Declamatory Contest, Monday, 10:30 A. M., May 26th. 

Battalion Drill and Awarding of Military Prizes, Monday, 2:30 P. M., 
May 26th. 

Junior Oratorical Contest, Monday. 8:00 P. M., May 26th. 

Annual Meeting of Board <>t Trustees, Tuesday, 10:00 A. m., May 27th. 

Alumni Address, Tuesday, 10:30 A. M., May 27th. 

Alumni Reunion and Dinner, Tuesday Noon, May 27th. 

President's Annual Reception, Tuesday. 4 :oo P. M., May 27th. 

Senior Class Play, Tuesday, 8:00 p. M., May 27th. 

Graduation Exercises and Baccalaureate Address, Wednesday, 10:30 
A. m., May 28th. 

i9 J 3 

First Term begins, Wednesday, September 10th. 
Intersociety Oratorical Contest, Friday, November 21st. 
Thanksgiving Holidays, November 27th to December 1st. 
Christmas Holidays, December 20th to December 29th. 



1914 

Midsession Examinations begin, January 10th. 

First Term ends, January 24th. 

Second Term begins, January 26th. 

Anniversary of Philomathic Literary Society, February 6th. 

Anniversary of Franklin Literary Societv, April 17th. 

Final Examinations begin, May 18th. 

Commencement, May 25th to May 28th. 



Board of Trustees 



James B. Ellis, President Selma, Ala. 

A. D. Smith, Vice-President Birmingham, Ala. 

P. C. Ratliff, Secretary Birmingham, Ala. 

FIRST DIVISION— TERMS EXPIRE IN 19 13 

J. T. Ashcraft Florence, Ala. 

G. D. Motley Gadsden, Ala. 

John R. Keyton Dothan, Ala. 

J. B. Ellis Selma, Ala. 

J. S. Carroll Troy, Ala. 

J. G. LOWERY Birmingham, Ala. 

W. P. McADORY Birmingham, Ala. 

J. C. Maxwell Alexander City, Ala. 

SECOND DIVISION— TERMS EXPIRE IN 19 14 



A. W. Bell 
S. S. Broadus 
D. C. Cooper 
W. J. E. Cox 
J. W. Mixor 
L. Lasseter 
R. E. Petti rs 
J. C. Wright 



Anniston, Ala. 
Decatur, Ala. 
Oxford, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Montgomery, Ala. 
Huntsville, Ala. 
Roanoke, Ala. 



THIRD DIVISION— TERMS EXPIRE IN [915 



W. M. B I. .UK. WELDER 

J. A. French . 
W. C. Davis . 
William A. Davis 
D. M. Powell 
P. C. Ratliff . 
A. I). Smith . 
I). II. Marbury 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Eufaula, Ala. 
Columbia, Ala. 
Anniston, Ala. 
Greenville, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Marbury, M». 




Alumni Trustees 



S. W. Welch . 
J. D. Heacock 



Talladega, Ala. 

1 erm Expires in 1 91 5 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Term Expires in 19 13 

H. J. WlLLINGHAM Montgomery, Ala. 

Term Expires in 19 14 

\Y.\i. A. Davis, Treasurer of Endowment . Anniston, Ala. 

D. C. COOPER, Auditor of the College . . Oxford, Ala. 

R. H. HUNT, Architect of the College . . Chattanooga, Term. 

JAMES WALKER, Jr., Land Agent .... Birmingham, Ala. 

Committees of the Board of Trustees 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

J. W. Minor, Chairman 
P. C. Ratliff 

W. P. McAdory 

\Y. M. Blackwelder 

The President of the Board 

The President of the College 

COMMITTEE ON HONORARY DEGREES 



J. T. ASHCRAFT 



D. H. Marbury 
W. C. Davis 



J. G. LOWERY 



ENDOWMENT INVESTMENT COMMITTEE 
A. \Y. BELL. Chairman 



J. B. Ellis 



A. D. Smith 
W. A. Davis 



D. C. Cooper 









BENTRE-NQU*I7 




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BIENTRE-NDM7 




rACULTY ft£S/DE \ 





James Madison SHelburne, A.M.. Th.M., D.I). 
President of the College 

A.M., Georgetown College, [897; D.D., ibid., 1907; 
Th.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, [900. 




Allen Jefferson Moon, A.B.. A.M.. 
L.H.D. 

Professor of Greek and Latin 

A.B.. Lineville College. 1896; A.B., 
Howard College, 1897; A.M., Howard 
College, 1902; Teacher Hartselle College, 
1897-1899; Student University of Virginia. 
1 899- 1 90 1 ; Student University of Chicago, 
summer quarters, 1903 and 1909; Professor 
of Latin. Rawlings Institute. Virginia; 
Professor of Greek and Latin. Howard 
College, since 1901 ; President of Society 
of Alumni, 1908- 1909; Fellow University 
of Chicago, 1910-1911. 



John C. Dawson. A.B.. A.M. 

Professor of Modern Languages 

A.B., Georgetown College, 1901 ; Prin- 
cipal Scottsboro, Alabama, Baptist Institute, 
1901-1903; Studied in Germany and 
France, spring and summer 1903; in Ger- 
many in 1907; University of Caen, France, 
1909; Student Cornell University; summer 
1904; University of Chicago, summer 
1905; Fditor of Picard's "La Petite Ville;" 
Instructor in Modern Languages in Sum- 
mer School for Teachers. University of Ala- 
bama, in 191 1, ■ Professor of Modern Lan- 
guages in Howard College since [903. 





James Albert Hendricks, A.B., A.M., 

Th.B. 

Professor of Economics and History, and 
Instructor in the Bible 

A.B. and A.M., Howard College, 1892; 
Th.B., Southern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary, Louisville, 1895; Student of Church 
History, Union Seminary, New York, 1902- 
1903; Graduate Student Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York, [902-1903; Graduate 
Student University of Chicago, summer 
quarters, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911; Profes- 
sor in Howard College since 1905. 



Alfred H. Olive, A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Chemistry rind Physics 

A.B.. 1905; A.M.. Wake Forrest Col- 
lege, 1 <jo(>; Instructor and Student at 
Wake Forest. [905-1906; Instructor anil 
Student Cornell University, KJ06-1907; 
Professor in Howard College since 1907. 





George W. Macon, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology 

A.B., Howard College, 1884; A.M.. 
Howard College; Ph.D., University of 
Alabama ; Graduate Student Columbia 
University, New York, and Brooklyn Bio- 
logical Institute, New York; Professor in 
Howard College; Professor of Biology, 
Mercer University, Georgia, 1895-1908; 
Dean of Howard College, 1908-1910. 



Percy P. Burns, A.B. 

Professor of English 

Graduate of Howard College, 1904; 
Professor in South Carolina Co-Kducational 
Institute, 1904-1910; Principal Howard 
College Academy, Acting Professor of 
English, Commandant, 1911-1912; Pro- 
fessor of English in Howard College since 
1912. 





C. M. Sarratt, A.H. 

Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Cornell University, New York; 
Teacher of Mathematics, High School, 
Elizabeth, N. C, 1909-10; Graduate Stu- 
dent Harvard University, summers, 1908- 
1909; Graduate Student Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1910-1911; Acting Professor of 
Mathematics, Howard College, 1911-1912; 
Professor of Mathematics in Howard Col- 
lege since 19 12. 



B. L. Noojin, B.S. 

Principal of the Academy and Physical 
Director 

B.S., University of Alabama, 1908; 
Teacher of Science and Physical Director, 
Ninth District Agricultural School, 
Blountsville, Ala., 1908-11; Teacher of 
Science and Physical Director, Seventh 
District Agricultural School, Albertville. 
Ala., 1911-12; Principal of Academy, and 
Physical Director of Howard College since 
1912. 





*M. A. Hoffmax, A.B. 
Instructor in Academy 



R. B. Kelly, Jr., A.B. 
Instructor in A code my 



f I)ied during the year. 




BENTRE-NQM7 




E. M. Haggard. A.B. 
Instructor in Academy 



J. C. ^TIVENDER 
Adjutant 





Mrs. M. L. H \rris 

Matron 



Committees of the Faculty 



ATHLETICS: Professors Noojin and Macon. 

Buildings and Grounds: Professors Olive and Macon. 

Catalogue and Other Publications: Professors Dawson and Sarratt. 

Classification of Students: 

(a) For students entering college: Professors Dawson and Sarratt. 

(b) For all other students below Seniors: Professors Burns and 

Olive. 

(c) For Seniors and Post-Graduates : The President of the College 

and Professor Macon. 

Health of Students: Professors Sarratt and Noojin. 

Library and Reading Room: Professors Olive and Hendricks. 

Lectures and Public Entertainments: Professors Hendricks and 
Macon. 

Positions for GRADUATES: The President and Secretary of Faculty. 

SCHEDULE and CURRICULUM: Professors Dawson and Olive. 

Scholarships: The President and Treasurer. 

Student Organizations and Petitions: Professors Moon and Hen- 
dricks. 

A. J. MOON 
Treasurer of the College 

J. C. DAWSON 
Purchasing Agent 

C. M. SARRATT 
Secretary of the Faculty 



Academy Roll 



Acton, W. I). 
Acton, Fred 
Bates, Joe 
Carlisle, Herbert 
Cook, W. J. 
Collins, Grady 
Clements, Alfred 
Cunningham, Colli: 
Chandler, W. W. 

Duran, Julian 
Dinkins, W. C. 
Daniels, D. L. 
Edwards, W. T. 
Ferguson, C. H. 
Farley, Rosser 
Gallant, Fred 
Griffin, W. R. 
Gay, J. H. 
Greene, G. R. 
Hayes, Homer 



Hargrave, C. 
Jordan, Webb 
Kilpatrick, \V. S. 
King, Charlton 
Lowrey, Rupert 
Leckey, G. 
Lewis, W. I. 
Leonard, Frank 
Lokey, B. C. 
M arler, R. S. 
Mc Daniel, Ray 
Moorman, Fred 
Moore, J. A. 
Mason, D. C. 
Mason, H. E. 
Norman, Jeff 
Norman, Dan- 
Owen, Vaux 
Pitch ford, John- 
Patrick, W. A. 
Rich, R. G. 



Ray, Guy 
Reynolds, Reuben 
Routon, E. H. 
Ramsey, Clarence 
Rowan, Jim 
Reid, Avery 
Stodghill, O. J. 
Swindall, O. P. 
Seals, P. W. 
Smith. R. D. 
Thompson, S. A. 
Williams, S. T. 
Ward, Mike 
Vice, L. T. 

DoCKERY, L. W. 

Martin, Fred 
Goodwin, B. 
Wait irs, L. 
Steely, C. J. 
Jones, S. C. 
Watson, W. 



Moonlight 



Alone I plodded through the forest path 

In quiet dream, 
While through the autumn leaves, upon the ground, 

A gorgeous stream 
Of moonlight flooded o'er me, and as I drank 

From this great sea 
Of mystic beauty rare, my soul was filled 

With purity. 

Soft, sweet moonlight to whom my soul confides. 

In raptures low, 
The secrets of its love, and finds a friend 

Who shares my woe! 
I hope that when my corpse within the ground 

Doth lie, and mine 
Eternal spirit soars, that on that sirave, 

Thou'll ever shine. 

— Selected. 







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Freshman Class 



Motto: The Green Grass Grows All Around 

Colors: Bull-frog Green and Huckleberry Blue 
Flower: Dog Fennel and Blue Peach Blossom 





OFFICERS 




John D. Wilson 




President 


J. P. Gaines 




lice-President 


D. L. Blackwelder 




Secretary 


C. D. Boozer 




Historian 


Emory Berkstresser 


MEMBERS 


. Prophet 


Blake, Preston* 


Gaines. J. P. 


O'Rear. Clarence 


Blackwelder, D. L. 


Hutchin, J. 


Powell, H. A. 


Boozer, C. D. 


Garner, B. H. 


Reaves. H. B. 


Blake, T. A. 


Harris, G. M. 


SCHIMMEL. \V. J. 


Berkstresser, Emory 


Hester, C. H. 


Shaw, E. C. 


Burt, G. W. 


Howell, S. S. 


Ten n ant, \V. T. 


Duke, R. E. 


Lamer. M. W. 


Tate, R. L. 


FULLINGTON, E. B. 


Leftwich, L. C. 


Wyatt. T. C. 


Freeman, J. I. 


MONCRIEI", A. C. 


Watson, L. I). 


Ford, E. L. 


Olive, J. F. 


Wilson, J. D. 



Freshman Poem 



I am sure you have heard 
That Freshies are £reen, 

But don't say a word 

About those of Thirteen. 




Sophomore Class 



Colors: Purple and White 



Motto: Du/ti edo semper gaudeo 



OFFICERS 



Pearson Grady Compton President 

Elbert James Hodge Vice-President 

Bex Ellis Dux away Secretary 

James D. Pickexs Historian 

Bledsoe Kelly Poet 



MEMBERS 

Upshaw C. Bextley, 2 N, Philomathian . 
Johx Thomas Blackshear, * A, Franklin 
Wilsox Deax Black welder, n K A, Franld 
Harry Brooks Bradley, 2 N, Franklin . 
Pearson Grady Compton, Franklin . 
Curtis Fred Duke, 2 X, Franklin 
Ben Ellis Dunaway, * A, Franklin . 
Ernest Houston Dunlap, Philomathian 
Charlie McKee Gary, Franklin . 
Clarence Kelly Gilder, * A, Franklin . 
Archie Franklin Glass, Franklin . 
Elbert James Hodge, -J/ A, Franklin . 
William Watt Jordan, II K A, Franklin 
Bledsoe Kelly, 2 X, Franklin .... 
Foster Mills, Philomathian .... 
Martin Comer Newman. ^ a, Franklin . 
James D. Pickens, Franklin .... 
John Reuben Robertson, II K A, Franklin 
WALTER J. SCHIMMEL, Philomathian . 
Wilbur D. South, II K A. Franklin . 
Robert Lee Tate, ^ A, Franklin . 
Sanford Allia Taylor, Franklin . 
Ben Hill Walker, II K A, Franklin . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Dothan, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Demopolis, Ala. 
Gadsden, Ala. 
Orrville, Ala. 
Prattville, Ala. 
Conner, Ala. 
Carbon Hill. Ala. 
Mountain Creek, Ala. 
Carrollton, Ala. 
Midway, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
May, Ala. 
Collinsville, Ala. 
Mt. Hope, Ala. 
Bessemer, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Warrior, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Camp Hill, Ala. 



Sophomore History 




'TEADILY but surely we are climbing to the top. With "Up- 
ward" as our motto, we have marched on from the very bottom 
to the middle ground, and soon we will have reached the goal. 
While our hearts have been set on literary achievements, yet in the other 
departments of college activity our rank is recognized as being high. In 
athletics, the Class of '15 has done its share. "The College Baby," and 
others of our number, have successfully met the enemy on the football 
field; and on the diamond we have forced the other classes to take notice; 
while on the track, a number of '15 men have shown rare form. 

So in every way, though the Profs, might except one, the year 
' 1 2-' 1 3 has been a very successful one for us. Professor Dawson has 
been successful in teaching us to address a gentleman as "Monsieur" and 
a lady as "Madame," or "Mademoiselle," and other professors have been 
gratified by accomplishments of equal importance. Encouraged by the 
achievements of the past year and realizing our great strength, we stand 
on the summit of "Know All Hill" and challenge the difficulties of Ju- 
niority. 



Junior Class 



OFFICERS 

BuNYAN Davie President 

Robert Salter Ward rice-President 

Earle Parker Secretary 

Oscar Samuel Causey Historian 

I. Frederick Simmons Poet 

MEMBERS 

Oscar Samuel Causey, 2 N, Franklin .... Healing Springs, Ala. 

Bunyan Davie, 2 N, Franklin Clayton, Ala. 

Joe Frank Duke, 2 N, Franklin Gadsden, Ala. 

Emmett Fitzhugh Day, IT K A, Franklin . . . Selma, Ala. 

G. Ira Dunsmore, * A, Franklin Stanton, Ala. 

John Amos Huff, * A, Franklin Birmingham, Ala. 

Earle Parker, Philomathian Lineville, Ala. 

Roy Alfred Jones, n K A, Philomathian .... Newton, Ala. 

I. Frederick Simmons, II K. A, Franklin .... Monroeville, Ala. 

J. Ralph Stodghill, II K A, Franklin .... Birmingham, Ala. 

Jefferson Davis Thompson, ^ A, Philomathian . Birmingham, Ala. 

Jesse P. Thorn berry, Philomathian Valley Head, Ala. 

James Alto Ward, Franklin Geneva, Ala. 

Robert Salter Ward, Franklin Geneva, Ala. 

Robert Robinson, n K A, Franklin Thorsby, Ala. 

Earle Wendall Holmes, Franklin Montgomery, Ala. 

John J. Mii.ford, Philomathian Birmingham, Ala. 



Junior History 



OUR Freshman and Sophomer years, filled with hard work and 
heavy cares, have passed into history, and after a period of great 
strife and tumult we have succeeded in breaking down the barriers 
between us and the Land of the Juniors. 

We have great joy in our work. We often think that "The most 
manifest sign ot wisdom is cheerfulness," and especially do we think of 
this on Monday mornings when lessons have not been prepared. But it 
has been hinted that the Profs, arc hard to deceive about such matters, 
even by cheerfulness. 

As to what we have done, we have the honor of stating to you that 
every member of our class passed the much-dreaded Mid-year Exams. 
In athletics the Class of '14 has a splendid representation. In oratory — 
well, even the Seniors envy us. Nor are we neglecting the social side of 
life, for we believe that association with the "Fair Ones" has its part in 
bringing about true culture. In all the activities of college life we have a 
part and feel that it is our duty to do our best, and we cherish the hope 
that some day we will reach that blissful land of the Seniors. 



A Junior's Toast 

Here's to the Freshman, 
^ our hardships we know well. 

You came to college 

Fishing or know ledge, 
But you will catch — well, well! 

Here's to the Sophomore, 
(Now we had better hush.) 

His explanations 

And exhortations 
Would make Minerva blush. 



And, worthy Seniors. 

Parting is truly sad. 
The race once begun 
With patience you've run, 

And now the world is glad. 



here's to you ! 



*/xxott 




Senior Class 

OFFICERS 

W. R. Rigei.i President 

J C. Stivender Vice-President 

H. B. Gilmer Secretary 

C. B. HASTY Historian 

W. C. Blake Poet 

C. B. KlNGRY Prophet 







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Senior Poem 



Father Time has awakened from slumher at last, 
And has hewn for these years a wee niche in the past 
All the joys and the fears he has safely enclosed 
Where there's no escape from the doom he's imposed. 
But mysterious memory holds regal sway, 
And with Merlin's magical touch in a day, 
She has veiled all the lights with a roseate hue, 
And turned all the greys into lovliest blue. 

But from all these memories is garnered one thought, 

That 'tis only the good which a respite has caught 

From the restless spirit of time in its flight, 

And 'tis only the good that can last through the fight. 

Now a future awaits us surpassingly fair, 

And a life's to he woven with ceaseless care; 

So the pattern we'll use for each work of our loom 

In this purpose so lofty nil nisi bonum. 



Senior Class Directory 



William Campbell Blake, A.B., Sigma Nu (Franklin) . . Birmingham, Ala. 
Historian Freshman Class, 'og-'io; Contestant for Junior Medal, 'ii-'i2; Repre- 
sentative in Alabama Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest, '13; Senior Class Poet, 
'13; Second Lieutenant Company "A," "i2-'i3; Entre-Nous Board, "i2-'i3. 

Hiram Bruister Gilmer, A.B. (Franklin) Butler, Ala. 

Contestant tor New Man's Medal, 'id; Track Team, 'io-'ii; Secretary of 
Senior Class, 'i2-'i3; Captain Company "C," '12-' 13; ENTRE-NOUS Board, 
'l2-'l3. 

Thomas Elihu Hand, A.B. (Philomathian) Wadley, Ala. 

Contestant New Man's Medal, '10; Vice-President Junior Class, "ii-'i2; 
Librarian, * 1 1 - * 1 -? ; First Lieutenant Company "C," 'l2-'l3; ENTRE-NouS Board, 
'12-13. 

Curtis Bush Hasty, A.B. , Psi Delta (Franklin) .... Nicholsville, Ala. 
Contestant New Man's Medal, 'io-'ii; Historian Sophomore Class, 'id-'ii; 
Contestant Sophomore Medal, '11 ; Manager Varsity Football, 11-12; Historian 
Junior Class, 'ii-'i2; Contestant Junior Medal, 12; Vice-President Y. M. C. A., 
'ii-'i2; Historian Senior Class, ' 1 2 - * 1 3 ; President of Y. M. C. A., ' 1 2 - ' 1 .? : 
Preliminary Contestant for State Oratorical Contest, '13; Vice-President Ath- 
letic Association, ' 1 2-' 1 3 ; President Alabama Intercollegiate Oratorical Associa- 
tion, ' 1 2-' 1 3 ; Captain Company "B," 12-13; Business Manager of ENTRE- 
Noi s, 'i2-'i3. 



James Franklin [sbell, A.B. (Philomathian) . 

Contestant New Man's Medal, '09-' 10; Military 
NOUS Board, '12-' 13. 



Ad 



utant, 



Francisco, Ala. 
' 1 2-' 1 3 ; Fxtre- 



CHARLES Bowdon Kincry, A.B., Psi Delta (Franklin) . . . Montgomery, Ala. 

President Sophomore Class, 'id-'ii; Contestant New Man's Medal, '11; Con- 
testant Sophomore Medal, '11; Captain Scrub Football, 'io-'ii; Track Team, 
'id-'i2; Manager Scrub Baseball. 'ii-'i2; Contestant Junior Medal, '12; Pre- 
liminary Contestant for State Oratorical Contest, 13; President of Athletic As- 
sociation, '12-13; Private Secretary to President, ' 1 2-' I 3 ; Senior Class Prophet, 
'i2-'h; First Lieutenant Company "A," 'i2-'m; Editor-in-Chief Entre-Nous, 

"I2-'I3. 



William Hugh McCary, B.S., Pi Kappa Alpha (Philomathian) Birmingham, Ala. 
Secretary of Junior Class, 'ii-'i2; Entre-Nous Board, 'i2-'i3. 

William J. Mims, A.B. (Franklin) Thorsby, Ala. 

Principal of High School, Asheville, Ala. 

William Richard Rigell, A.B. (Philomathian) Geneva, Ala. 

Contestant New Man's Medal, '11 ; Contestant Sophomore Medal, 11 ; Winner 
Percy Medal, '11; Intersociety Debate, 'io-'ii; Contestant Junior Medal, '12; 
President Junior Class, 'ii-'i2; Manager of Tennis, 'ii-'i2; Preliminary Con- 
testant for State Oratorical Contest, '13; President of Senior Class, "i2-'i3; 
Annual Sermon to Ministerial Class, ' 1 2-' 1 3 ; First Lieutenant Company "B ;" 
Entre-Nous Board, 'i2-'i3. 

James Calvin Stivender, A.B. (Philomathian) Akron, Ala. 

Contestant for New Man's Medal, 'oq-'io; Winner of Sophomore Medal, '11; 
Winner of Junior Medal, '12; Intersociety Debate, '1 2-' 1 3 ; Preliminary Con- 
testant for State Oratorical Contest, '13; Vice-President of Senior Class, ' 1 2-' 1 3 ; 
Academic Adjutant, ' 1 2-' 1 3 ; Entre-Nous Board, ' 1 2-'i 3. 




Senior Class Prophecy 



ON a balmy night in April, having resisted the "Call of the Wild," 
and having nothing else to do, I tell into a deep slumber — for a 
fact — and was promptly wafted into the blissful Land of Dreams. 
' I w as a strange dream, for it seemed to me that lather Time had become 
displeased with his accustomed pace and had skipped about ten years. It 
seemed that I was on a vacation and had taken lodging at New York's 
famous hostlery, the Waldorf-Astoria — my dream took on a more mystic 
aspect. I awaked early in the morning — more strange — and after a light 
breakfast, I took a seat in the lobby to think over plans for my vacation. 
The first thought that came to my mind was that I should go in a south- 
ward direction and that I should look up some of my old college friends. 
The " Twentieth Century Limited" was due to leave the Terminal at 9:10 
and a glance at my watch told me that I would have to hurry to catch this 
train. 

On arrival at Chicago and in making preparations to catch the next 
train for St. Louis, whom should I see but my old friend, Bill Blake. He 
hadn't changed much since I saw him last — his hair had not lost its wavy 
effect and he was still carrying his feet at a forty-five degree angle. From 
our conversation I found that he had finished at Johns Hopkins several 
years before and had started out on his medical career in Chicago, and 
despite the vastness of the town and other complications, had worked up 
a good practice. 

St. Louis was a very attractive city and I decided to stop over for a 
few days. During my rambles I met Hiram Gilmer on the streets. He 
was on his way to lunch and I accepted his invitation to join him. 1 [e 
told me that he had given up his idea of studying medicine, mainly because 
he thought the clothes that doctors usually wore would not hang well on 
him, and that he was now demonstrating the latest cuts in one of the large 
clothing stores there. 

Scarcely had I bid Gilmer farewell when I met Curtis Hasty. He 
seemed to be in a great hurry. He was carrying a couple of heavy grips, 
and had the appearance of a traveling salesman, which 1 found to be the 
case. He was traveling out of St. Louis for Roberts, Johnson & Rand 
Shoe Co. He was on his way to the L. & N. terminal to catch a train 
and I went with him as far as Mount Vernon, 111., which town he was to 
work that day. 



At Nashville I found Tom Hand. He was now one of the best 
dentists in Nashville. I spent several very pleasant days with him and his 
family. 

Naturally my next stopping place was dear old Birmingham. It had 
grown almost beyond my knowledge, but I could distinguish several fa- 
miliar scenes. I found that the Baptist State Convention was in session 
at the First Baptist Church, and I was sure that I would find several of 
my old friends here. I soon ran up with Rev. James Franklin Isbell, 
whom I used to call "Izzy." He said "Howdydooer" just as ever and 
told me that he was ministering to a large flock at Browns Cross Roads. 
Bill Rigell was there, too, and met me with a majestic stride, a beaming 
countenance and a hearty handshake. I learned from Isbell that he was 
one of the leading preachers in the State. While we were talking over 
old times, Stivender came up. He was just as tall and slender as a tele- 
graph pole. He, too, was preaching, and was pastor of a powerful 
church in South Alabama. 

We visited the College that afternoon, and I found that it had im- 
proved greatly. "Cotton" Minis was now Professor of English, and 
Hugh McCary had the Department of Chemistry. 

On making inquiries about the whereabouts of Kingry, I found that 
he had gone to China as a medical missionary and had made surgical 
discoveries that were truly wonderful. 

All these experiences were so very delightful that it was with reluc- 
tance that I caught the northbound L. & N. the next morning and started 
back home. 






A. C. Swindall, A.B., A.M. 





ALUMNI 



1 




W. C. Griggs 
OFFICERS 

\V. C. GRIGGS President 

\V. R. Berry Vice-President 

\V. A. BERRY Secretary-Treasurer 



The Coming of Dr. Shelburne to Howard 



M^fc-^HE coming of Dr. Shelburne is not as that of a stranger. On the 
M Cj contrary, it was his service of nine years as pastor of the College 
^^^^ church at East Lake, and his close touch with the college during 
that time, that made him instantly and unanimously acceptable to the trus- 
tees on the resignation of Dr. Montague in June of last year. It is 
doubtful if any man better understood the needs of the college or if any 
man outside the faculty was more conversant with its internal workings 
and administrative and academic problems. It is not too much to say 
that those who knew the college and knew Dr. Shelburne, unanimously 
applauded the selection of the board of trustees. 

The temper and bent of Dr. Shelburne's mind and the classical thor- 
oughness of his education and scholarship had given him many honors 
before he came to Alabama the first time; and those same qualities turned 
to the needs of a pastorate in the great Birmingham District gave him 
large and widely recognized success. Perhaps more significant even than 
the respect that his literary and sermonic ability gained him from the dis- 
criminating throughout the State, was the respect that came to him from 
the business men of this district and from the leaders of the denomination, 
when he discovered executive ability of rare order. The members of his 
church had a way of saying, "Dr. Shelburne can get more people working 
and get more work out of them than anybody else;" a leading merchant of 
Birmingham said, prior to the selection of the Trustees, "The man they 
want is Dr. Shelburne. He is the best business man I ever saw in the 
pulpit." When it is added that the pastor of a down-town church re- 
marked after Dr. Shelburne's election, "They have spoiled a mighty fine 
preacher to make Howard a president," we seem to have summed up the 
most significant indications for a forecast of Dr. Shelburne's administra- 
tion. 

The standard of scholarship is not to be lowered, but instead is to 
be raised consistently and steadily, as in the past; and with that we are to 
have a business administration with system and the greatest possible effici- 
ency as the key words. The latest catalogue shows that the curriculum 
has been raised considerably, that the elective system has been so widely 
extended as to give options on thirty-two of the sixty-four points required 
for graduation; and that the Academy of Howard is to be still further 
enlarged and is to be made more prominent and efficient, until it shall be- 
come a great preparatory school appealing to the whole district and State. 




In the line of improvements on the campus will be the new gymnasium 

and the installation of a central heating plant, both promised for the near 
future. In the way ot extension work it is expected that next session will 
see the development ot plans for a fully organized ami well-equipped 
Summer School. 

All who know Dr. Shelburne have learned his clear vision and his 
ability to formulate policies, ami they have faith in his ability to carry 
through his plans ami realize his visions. 

P. P. B.— '..4. 




The Class of '12 as it is Today 



Joe Acker is holding a good position with the Schloss-Sheffield Steel 
& Iron Co., as Assistant Chemist at the Schloss Furnace. 

A. C. Anderson is teaching in the high-school at Clio. 

Archie Bolen is the smiling and gracious landlord of the East Lake 
Drug Co. 

H. H. Buzbee is pursuing the course at the Seminary at Louisville. 

J. E. Dean is principal of the Draketown Baptist Institute, at Drake- 
town, Ga. 

Walter Gwin is studying medicine at Tulane University, New Or- 
leans, La. 

Leon Harris is studying medicine at Chicago University. 

M. A. Hoffman died of meningitis in January, 19 13. 

W. K.E. Janes is pastor of the Baptist Church at Xorthport, Ala. 

K. B. Kelly, Jr., is one of the instructors in the Howard College 
Academy. 

P. W. Lett is teaching in the school at Choccolocco, Ala. 

The whereabouts of E. I. Oliver are unknown at this writing, but 
we hope to locate him in the near future. 

T. W. Smyly died of typhoid fever in July, 191 2. 

"Red" Sorrel seems determined on a political career and is working 
for his father in the Probate Office at Dadeville. 

A. C. Swindall does not seem to be able to quench his thirst for 
knowledge. He is taking his A.M. degree here this year. 

J. O. Williams is at the Seminary, where he is doing splendid work. 

J. M. Collier is principal of the Decatur High-School, Decatur, Ala. 




' 




r 





H.C. 





Col. P. P. Burns 




BATTALION 



Battalion Officers 



C.APT. J. F. Isbei.L Military Adjutant 

Lieut. G. Ira Dunsmore Sergeant Major 

Sergeant W. C. Griffin Quartermaster 

Serjeant W. C. TlSDALE Color Sergeant 



Company "A" 



OFFICERS 



Captain W. H. Carson 

Lieutenant C. B. Kingry 

Lieutenant W. C. Blake 

J. R. Stodghill . 

Bunyan Davie 

J. I). Pickens 

P. G. Compton 

R. S. Ward . 

Bledsoe Kelly 

Watt W. Jordan 

A. F. Glass . 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
First Sergeant 
Second Sergeant 
Third Sergeant 
Fourth Sergeant 
First Corporal 
Second Corporal 
Third Corporal 
Fourth Corporal 



Moore 
Reynolds 
Chandler 
Leftwich 
Blackwelder. I). L 



MEMBERS 

Cunningham 
Stodghill, ( ). J. 
Dunning 
Fullington 



Robertson 
Gaines 
How ell 
Freeman 
Blake, P. 





14 ^^ 

FoTure He w arc Sponsors 





.. 



BENTRE-NQUMT 



Company "B" 



OFFICERS 



Captain C. B. Hasty . 

Lieutenant W. R. Rigell 

Lieutenant G. D. Motley 

I. F. Simmons 

E. F. Day . 

W. D. South 

Earle Parker 

J. A. Ward . 

R. A. Jones . 

B. E. Dun \\\ ay 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
First Sergeant 

Second Sergeant 
Third Sergeant 
Fourth Sergeant 
First Corporal 
Second Corporal 
Third Corporal 



Blackwelder, W. D. 

Blake, T. A. 

Din kins 

Gallant 

Gay 

Jordan, Webb 



MEMBERS 

Harris, G. M. 

Harlan 

King 

Mui.LINS 
( )WEN 
( )LIVE 



Patrick 

Kim 
Rowan- 
Shaw 

Williams, S. T 
Watson 



Company "C" 







OFFICERS 


Captain H. B. Gilmer 


Lieutenant T. E. Hand . 






Lieutenant J. P. Thornberry 






O. S. Causey 






W. J. SCHIMMEL 










C. M. Gary . 










C. K. Gilder 










Robert Robinson 










E. W. Holmes . 










S. A. Taylor 










T. C. Wyatt 










.MEMBERS 


Boozer Lowrey 


Clements Mason, H. E 


Ferguson Mason, D. C 


Ford Norman, D. 


Griffin 




Norma 


V, 


J. 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
First Sergeant 
Second Sergeant 
Third Sergeant 
Fourth Sergeant 
First Corporal 
Second Corporal 
Third Corporal 
fourth Corporal 



Ray 
Reaves 
Tate 
Walker, B. H. 

Wilson 



- 




1 



* 




R. L. NoojIN, Coach 




FQDT-BAl: 1 



Athletic Association 



OFFICERS 



C. H. Kingry 
C. B. Hasty . 
B. L. Noojin 



President 

I ice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



Athletic Council 



C. B. KlNORY 


\V. C. Tisdai.i; 
B. L. Noojin 

MEMBERS 


W. A. BERRY 


South 


Leftwich 


Blackwelder, W. I) 


Dike, R. E. 


Dunning 


Walker, B. H. 


Dike, J. F. 


Ward. J. A. 


Ml i.i.i xs 


Hasty 


Ward. R. S. 


Reynolds 


( i \ 1 X ES 


Wilson 


Vice 


( rARNER 


Powell 


Gilder 


Norman, J. 


Harlan 


Gallant 


Simmons 


Robinson 


Glass 


Causey 


Robertson 


Pickexs 


Acton, J. A. 


Griffin, W. C 


FULLINGTON 


Blake, W. C. 


Day 


Thornberry 


Ramsey 


Texxaxt 


Hayes 


Watson 


Jordan 


Cunningham 


Howell 


Berkstresser 


Ray 


Tisdai.i: 


Stodghill, J. R. 


Blake, P. 


Blackwelder, I). L. 


Owen 


S \RRATT 


Clements 


Compton 


Kelly, R. B. 


Ford 


Cook 


KlNGRY 


I) \VIE 


Newman 


ST I VENDER 



BENTRE-NDU5I? 




MISS LUCILE MORRIS 
AlAto 



MISS MYRT/CE WftlOHT 
MAID 



IoqtbalL 



Here's to the Howard boys 

And the dear old Southern College, 
A place to go to have the fun, 

And gain just lots of knowledge. 

"It's the life of the town," 

Has been truthfully said, 
For when the boys leave, 

Old East Lake is dead. 

The boys are all nice, 

So manly and dear. 
In the summer the girls miss their. 

Dreadfully. I tear. 

They're always doing things. 

Especially that Senior Class. 
I hate to say it, but I must, 

It certainly beats the last. 

1 (1 like to say a good word 

About the other classes, 
Hut don't think they care for much, 

But to catch the little lasses. 



Now all join in waving 
The Crimson and Blue. 

Speak good <>f the College, 
And to the boys be true. 



Howard's 1912 Football Season 



This year was the beginning of a new regime in Howard's Athletics, 
as well as in the other departments of the College. Coach Xoojin has 
started out to build up a system of athletics here that will insure us against 
lack of material for our various teams. 

At the beginning of this year, how- 
ever, he had very poor material with 
which to start up his system. Only 
three of the last year's regulars came 
back, and only one of these was of the 
stellar variety. The remainder of the 
team had to be picked from raw re- 
cruits, some of whom had never even 
seen a football game. And in addition 
to this, our schedule was a rather 
heavy one. 

Coach Xoojin began early and did 
his best to get the squad in the very 
best shape possible, and he deserves 
much credit for his persistent and 
painstaking efforts. Most of the 
games resulted in defeats for How- 
ard, but it was not often that the op- 
posing team had anything like a run- 
away. 

'i ; - )i n i- (■ iCAPTAIN TlSDALl 

lisdale, Kobinson, Lraines and 
(iarner seemed to have the edge on 
the other members of the team when it came to playing real football, but 
the whole team deserves commendation tor its fighting spirit in the face 
of heavy odds. 

The Scrubs did splendid work all through the season and gave the 
Varsity some hard scrimmages, as well as winning a majority of its own 
scheduled games. Out of this squad, together with those of this year's 
Varsity who return next year, Howard should have a formidable repre- 
sentation on the i 9 [3 gridiron. 





Captain Robinson 
I9I3- 



Varsity Football Team, 1913 

B. L. NoojIN Coach 

Stodghill Student Manager and Left End 

TlSDALE Captain and Left Half Back 

Davie Center 

Gaines Right Guard 

Taylor Left Guard 

Garner Right Tackle 

MONCRIEF Left Tackle 

Duke Right End 

Robinson Quarter Hack 

Fullington Full Back 

Hayes Right Half Back 

Causey Substitute Full Back 

ACTON Substitute Half Back 

Cook Substitute End 

SCHEDULE 

September 28 — Jacksonville Normal Campus 

October 5 — Clemson Birmingham 

October 12 — Mercer Birmingham 

October 18 — Marion Institute Marion 

October 26 — Albertville Agricultural Albertville 

November 2 — Tulane New ( Means 

November 15 — Birmingham College Birmingham 

November 28 — Mississippi College Hattiesburg 



Scrubs 



R. B. Kelly Coach 

I. F. Simmons Manager 

GALLANT Captain and Quarter Back 

Rich Center 

BlACKWELDER, L Left Guard 

McPHAUl Right Guard 

Walker Left Tackle 

Howell Right Tackle 

Watson Left End 

Shaw Right End 

Hasty Left Half Back 

Glass Full Back 

KlNGRY Full Back 

King Right Half Back 

Ford Substitute End 

COMPTON Substitute 

BLAKE Substitute 

SCHEDULE 

Birmingham College Scrubs Campus 

I'nslc\ High School Campus 

Bessemer High School Campus 

Shelb} County High School (jam pus 

Tuscaloosa Training School Campus 

Ensley High School Ensley 






y 



CJ 




MISS WILL If tfNKROH 



WC TlSOALE. 

Captain 



MMMfRT/U BRIGHT 
MAID 



BASEBALL 



Baseball Prospective 



W^^-^HE baseball season of 19 13, with its fresh green grass and its 
■ ** j budding leaves, will soon be upon us. Already the boys have 
^^^^ responded to the call for candidates with a vim, and have begun 
to try to persuade the coach of their ability by hard and persistent work in 
the initial "try-out." Soon we shall hear mingled with the crack of the 
bat and the sharp thud of the glove, those familiar strains, "Make 'im 
pitch," "Spoil the good 'uns and let the bad 'uns go by," "Any way to git 
on," and "Touch all the bags, Slick, touch all the bags." 

The prospects for a winning team this year are exceedingly bright. 
Of course, we know it is much easier to see a winning team on paper than 
on the diamond, for the "dope" may not in every case bring all the ex- 
pectations, but when a team has six of the best players return as a nucleus 
for a new one, it is hard to "see" a losing team. The six "old" men are, 
"Slick" Tisdale, captain-elect of the 1 9 1 3 squad and one of the best catch- 
ers in Southern college baseball; Ab Moncrief, the lengthy twirler of last 
year; "Rube" Motley, the phenomenal young twirler with much "stuff;" 
"Red" Robinson, the best first basemen in the world; "Little Boy Blue" 
Newman, outfielder; and "Spokane" Dunning, mighty wielder of the 
bludgeon. 

For the first time in years, there are at least two good men fighting 
for every position. The infield especially looms up strong, the candidates 
being fast, energetic, and willing ball players. And the outfield is by no 
means to be despised, as two of the "old" men are outfielders, while the 
other candidates are fast, experienced men. A new man by the name of 
Watters has recently come in to help Ab and Rube in the twirling depart- 
ment, which makes matters in that direction look more promising. 

Coupled with all this, we have one of the best coaches ever seen in 
these parts, and taking a look at the whole outfit, we believe we have the 
best pre-season prospects we have ever had. E. M. H., '10. 



Varsity Baseball Team 

B. L. Noojin Coach 

E. J. Hodge Manager 

W. C. TlSDALE Captain 

Robinson Moncrief Ward, J. A. 

Gilder Garner Vice 

Blackwei.der Watson Harris 

Newman Wilson Rowan 

Dunning South Dunsmore 

Moncrief Goodwin Motley 

Griffin Ford Fullington 

SCHEDULE 

Marion Institute Marion 

Southern University Greensboro 

Sr. Bernard College Cullman 

Ninth District Agricultural Blountsville 

Alabama Presbyterian College Anniston 

Seventh District Agricultural Albertville 

Birmingham College Birmingham 











W'Cjjj' 


- ^H 


J. E SIMMONS-' 




J t^/?/f / JOHNSON 


MANAGER 


JaJ 1 


SPONSOR 


H 


'•' v^*>« 




\%, 




(fl ^BfiL V 




1 


^m^ 






« .• J! 


Bui *ik_* • m 


^L 


>WB&»r£?^ ^ 


■lil'tinW-^. M 


/7?F0 GALLANT ^L 


mBr&^ jM 


ttthU^aMBfafl 


CAPTAIN 


tSw 


/WJ* /<W£ 6KAHAM 


A1/SS PUTH ANbEftSOM 


MAID 


TRACK. 


AiAlP 




Track Team Roll 



B. L. Noojix 
I. F. Simmons 
Gallant . 



Coach 
Manager 

Captain 



South 


Leonard 


Rich 


N i w man- 


DUNSMORE 


( il.ASS 


Owen 


Vice 


Acton 


COMPTON 




Olive 




Start of Three-Mile Road Race 



The Road Race 



ON a chilly Saturday afternoon, December 22, 191 2, with the 
wind blowing from the North at a lively rate, after having sub- 
sisted on practically nothing but eggs (mostly raw) and toast, five 
other long-distance runners and myself, viz.; Messrs. (Jallant, Acton 
South, Rich, Newman, representing Howard College, were given a chance 
to let out their pent-up energy along the streets of Birmingham for a 
course of some three miles or more. Nor were we alone. Practically 
titty other trained athletes from all over the South were competing in 
this long-distance run, held annually under the auspices of the Birmingham 
Athletic Ciub. 

Despite the unfavorable weather, the eager onlookers, including 
many of Birmingham's fairest maidens, thronged the streets all along 
the way and cheered the fatigued run- 
ners, encouraging them to do their 
best, and the verandas of the houses 
along the route were even crowded 
with cheering people. Naturally, we 
were thinly clad, and, as usual, the 
photographers took their own good 
time in getting our pictures at the start, 
and at the crack of the pistol we were 
indeed eager to warm ourselves up a 
bit, thus causing a rather fast pace to be 
set at the beginning. Motorcycle po- 
licemen cleared the streets in front of 
us, and officials and newspaper report- 
ers kept apace of the leaders in auto- 
mobiles. 

The real competition in the race 
came with us runners who were some- 
what behind the three leaders, Pla- 
towski, Beatty and Gallant, when the 

sprint began three blocks from the finish. I knew that we as a team were 
well up in the race, and, therefore resolved to let no one pass me from 
this point on, although I was well winded and never in my life felt as if 
a little rest would be so sweet. I stuck to my resolution with the exception 
of letting Rich, a member of our own team, pass me. Had I known by 
what a close score we were winning, I think I should have extended my 
resolution a little and resolved to pass someone instead of merely holding 




my own. Many of the runners were completely "blown" at the finish, 
some having to be escorted from the course by their friends. Neverthe- 
less, 'twas a GREAT day for HOWARD. We won something. Shortly 
after the finish of the race, and after much argument on the part of the 
judges and Coach Noojin, who closely kept up with the race and how each 
man finished, we were awarded the team prize, a handsome silver loving 
cup. 

G. Ira Dunsmore — '14. 




BIENTRE-NDU*!? 




mNTRE-NQU*l7 



Tennis 



While football, baseball and track are being duly emphasized, we 
must not overlook tennis. Not all our athletic talent can be claimed by 
the other teams. We have lots of men who for lack of time, physical 
build, etc.. decline the heavier sports, but are shining stars in tennis. 

On the campus are four excellent courts, and still others are in prog- 
ress of building. These courts are owned by the different fraternities and 
club<. 

While we did not have scheduled games this season, we hope next year 
to tackle some of the leading colleges of the State. Our Athletic Asso- 
ciation, seeing our opportunity and demand to push tennis, is putting forth 
efforts to arrange a good schedule. We are planning also to emphasize 
class and club contests in the College. 

Among the tennis "bright lights" are Duke. Rigell. Harris. Newnan, 
Robinson and Hand. Other players of ability are Ford. Leftn ich. Parker, 
Davie. Dunsmore. Kingry. Hasty and Stivender. 

General interest in the game is growing, and we hope to make it a 
favorite sport in the college and give it the place it really deserves in our 
athletics. 

J. C. Si l\ :• ntdi R — ' : j 



The Gymnasium 



Plans are now on foot for the erection of a spacious and handsome 
gymnasium, to he placed opposite the athletic field. The need of a well- 
equipped "gym" has heen long felt at Howard, and the het is about ten 
to one that next September, when the boys begin to come in, they will see 
this structure well on its way to completion. 



Sigma Nu 

(Founded at Virginia Military Institute, i86g) 

Colors: Old Gold, Black and White Flower: White Rose 

FOUNDERS 

James F. Hopkins James M. Riley 

John W. Hopson Greenfield Quarles 

Iota Chapter: Established 1879 

FRATER IN FACULTATE 
Richard Bussey Kei.i.v, Jr Birmingham, Ala. 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1913 
William Campbell Blake Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1 <n 4 

BUNYAN Davie. Jr Clayton, Ala. 

Joe Frank Duke Gadsden, Ala. 

Oscar Samuel Causey Healing Springs, Ala. 

Class of nji 5 

Qpshaw C. Bentley Birmingham, Ala. 

Harrv Brooks Bradley Birmingham, Ala. 

Curtis Fred Duke Gadsden, Ala. 

Bledsoe Kelly Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1916 

Preston Blake, Jr Birmingham, Ala. 

Willie Jackson Cook Baton Rouge, La. 

John Inzer Freeman Ashville, Ala. 

L. C. Leftwich Lineville, Ala. 

Jefferson I). Norman Ensley, Ala. 

Daniel Norman Ensley, Ala. 

William Kenyon Mullins Clanton, Ala. 



Ci^'r-, 





Psi Delta 



(Local — Founded IQOO) 



COLORS: Purple and Gold 



Flower: J'iolet 



FOUNDERS 

Mel Durant Smith Flavius Hatcher Hawkins 

W. L. Crawford Albert Lee Smith 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Percy Pratt Burns Elias Martin Haggard 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 191 3 

Curtis Bush Hasty Nicholsville, Ala. 

Charles Bowdon Kingry Montgomery, Ala. 

Class of 191 4 

John Amos Huff Birmingham, Ala. 

George Douglas Motley, Jr Gadsden, Ala. 

G. Ira Dunsmore Stanton, Ala. 

Jeff Dayis Thompson Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1915 

John Thomas Blackshear Dothan, Ala. 

Ben Ellis Dunaway Orrville, Ala. 

Clarence Kelly Gilder Carbon Hill, Ala. 

Elbert James Hodge Carrollton, Ala. 

Martin Comer Newman Collinsville, Ala. 

Robert Lee Tate Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of [916 

Garnett Mitchell Harris Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1 01 7 

Rei ben Reynolds remison, Ala. 

LEAKE Vice Carbon Hill, Al?. 



Pi Kappa Alpha 



(Founded University of Virginia, March i, 1858) 
Colors: Garnet and Old Gold Flower: Lily of the Valley 

Standard : Tulip 

FOUNDERS 
Frederick S. Taylor James B. Sch later 

Robertson Haward Littleton W. Tazewell 

Julian E. Wood 

Alpha Pi Chapter: Established 191 1 

FRATER IN FACULTATE 

M ELTON ARRINGTON HOFFMAN 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 
Class of 19 1 3 
William Hugh McCary Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 19 1 4 

Ira Fred Simmons Monroeville, Ala. 

J. Ralph Stodghill Birmingham, Ala. 

Roy Alfred Jones Newton, Ala. 

Robert Robinson Thorsby, Ala. 

Emmett Fitzhugh Day Selma, Ala. 



Class of 191 5 



Wilson Dean Blackwelder 
William Watt Jordan 
John Reuben Robertson . 
Wilbur D. South . 
Ben Hill Walker . 



D. L. Blackwelder 
W. T. Tennant 



Class of 1 91 6 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Midway, Ala. 
Bessemer, Ala. 
Warrior, Ala. 
Camp Hill, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Roanoke, Ala. 



John D. Wilson Jackson, Ala. 

Class of 1 91 7 

Willie C. Griffin Cullman, Ala. 




Fraternity Halls 




©rganuattnna 




Franklin Literary Society 



Blake, T. A. 


Gilmer 




Olive 


Blake, W. C. 


Glass 




Pickens 


Blackshear 


Griffin, \> 


". R. 


Robertson- 


Boozer 


Harlan 




Reynolds 


Burt 


Harris 




Rowan- 


Causey 


Holmes 




Seals 


Collins 


Hodge 




Shaw 


COMPTON 


HOOTON 




Simmons 


Day 


Howell 




South 


DlNKINS 


Huff 




Tate 


Duke, J. F. 


Jordan, \V 


\TT 


Taylor 


DUNAWAY 


Jordan, W 


EBB 


TlSDALE 


Dunning 


Kelly 




Vice 


Dunsmore 


Kin cry 




Walker, T. \\ 


Ford 


Leonard 




Ward, Mike 


Freeman 


Mason, D. 


C. 


Ward, J. A. 


FuLLINCTON 


Mason, H. 


E. 


Ward, R. S. 


Gallant 


Motley 




W VTSON 


Goodwin- 


McPhaul 




Williams, S. 


Gary 


N EWMAN 




Wilson 


Gilder 






Wyatt. T. C. 



Philomathic Literary Society 



Acton, J. A. 




Gay 


Ray 


Acton, Fred 




Hand 


Ri: w is 


Hi- NT LEY 




Hester 


Reed 


Berkstresser 




Isbell 


Rich 


Blackwelder, 


W. D. 


Jones, R. A. 


RlGELL 


Blackwelder, 


D. L. 


Lanier 


Robinson 


Blake, Preston 


I . E E 


SCHIMMEL 


Carson 




Leftwich 


Smith 


Chandler 




LOWREY 


Stivender 


Cook 




McCary 


S\\ INI) All., A. C. 


Cunningham 




MlLFORD 


SWINDALL, ( ). P. 


Davie 




Mills, H. F. 


Thompson, J. D 


Dun lap 




MONCRIEF 


Thompson . S. A 


Edwards 




Moorman 


Thornberry 


Ferguson 




Owen 


Vann 


( i VINES 




Parker 


Walker, B. H. 


( rARNER 




Patrick 


Watson, 1.. D. 





•? 



LITERARY SOCIETY 
MALLS 



Literary Societies 




INCE the years 1847 an< ^ 1858 there have been connected with 
Howard College ^wo literary societies, known as the Philomathic 
and Franklin, respectively. 

In order to induce men to take up oratory early in their college career, 
each society gives a New Man's Medal to the winner in a contest com- 
posed of four men, who have been selected from a preliminary contest. 

Each year during the months of February and April, the societies 
hold their anniversary meetings, at which time interesting programs are 
rendered. There is also an annual Intersociety Debate, each society being 
represented by two debaters. 

Both societies have sent out many men well equipped for service. 
They have come to the societies with trembling knees and stammering 
voices, and have acquired ease and eloquence on the stage before leaving. 
Among these there are some of the most prominent men in their chosen 
line of endeavor: In the ministry, such men as Dr. J. B. Hawthorne, Dr. 
J. R. Sampey, Dr. Hale of Louisville, Ky. In the medical profession, 
Dr. J. \V. Bell, of New York; Dr. J. D. Heacock, of Birmingham; Dr. 
E. P. Hogan, President of Birmingham Medical College; Dr. YV. M. 
YVilkerson, of Montgomery. As educators, Dr. D. S. Lyons, Professor 
of Semetic Languages in Harvard University and H. J. Willingham, State 
Superintendent of Education. 



Alabama Intercollegiate Oratorical 

Contest 



, S^^-^ I [E Alabama Intercollegiate Oratorical Association was organized 
f ^ J in the fall of 1902, through the efforts of Dr. W. S. Cox, founder 
^^^^ of Cox College, College Park, Ga. Delegates from Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute, Southern University and Howard College met in 
Montgomery and effected the organization, the purpose of which is to 
develop a friendly rivalry between the colleges in the cultivation of oratory. 

Under this organization a contest is held annually, each institution 
having a representative. A handsome gold medal, donated by Dr. Cox, 
is awarded the winner. 

The first contest was held in Montgomery in the spring of 1903, and 
Howard was represented by P. C. Barkley. The next year Howard was 
the host of the speakers, the contest being held in the college auditorium. 
This time J. O. Colley spoke for Howard. The following year found the 
speakers contesting in the auditorium of the Southern University at Greens- 
boro, and Howard's representative was F. M. Payne. Then the A. P. i. 
at Auburn entertained the orators, and her auditorium was the scene of 
the contest. In this contest W. A. Jenkins represented Howard. Again 
the contest came to Birmingham, and was held in the High-School Audi- 
torium, and J. A. Cook won the medal for Howard. He added yet an- 
other victory for his Alma Mater by winning the Southern contest at Mont 
Eagle, Tenn. For the next three years Selma had the contest and much 
interest was manifested on these occasions by our sisters at Judson. J. A. 
Prescott was the first speaker to represent Howard at Selma, being fol- 
lowed by M. E. Nettles, winner, and H. G. Grant. The next year the 
contest came back to the High-School auditorium at Birmingham. Here 
R. K. Hood spoke for Howard. The contest then went to Montgomery, 
with I . W. Smyly for Howard. At the meeting o\ the Association at this 
time, Birmingham College was admitted to the Association. The battle 
ground of the contest will be in Birmingham this year, with W. C. Blake 
as representative for Howard. 




M/ss Dudley Tutwilzr 



Mpss AiAfiG-A^tT De^ty 



Y. M. C. A. 



Motto: Not by might, nor by power, but by My spirit, saith the Lord of Hosts 

OFFICERS 

C. B. Hasty President 

I. F. Simmons Vice-President 

B. E. DuNAWAY Secretary 

Robert Robinson Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Berkstresser, Emory Hodge, E. J. Ricell, W. R. 

Blake, Preston Holmes, E. W. Robinson, Robert 

Carson, W. H. Howell, S. S. Robertson, J. R. 

Causey, O. S. Huff, J. A. Seals, P. W. 

Chandler, W. W. Isbell, J. F. Shaw, E. C. 

Compton, P. G. Jordan, Watt Simmons, I. F. 

Day, E. F. Jordan, Webb South, W. D. 

Dunaway, B. E. Kingry, C. B. Stivender, J. C. 

Dunning, G. H. Mason, D. C. Taylor, S. A. 

Edwards, W. T. Mason, H. E. Thompson, J. D. 

Fullington. E. B. Mills, H. F. Thornherry, J. F 

Gallant, \V. F. Motley, G. D. Vann, R. K. 

Gilder, C. K. Pickens, J. D. Vice, E. L. 

Gilmer, H. B. Ray, Guy Wilson. J. I). 

Hand, T. E. Reaves, H. B. Williams, S. T. 

Harris, G. M. Reid, A. H. W'yatt, T. C. 

Hasty, C. B. Reynolds, Reuben 




PL, 



Ministerial Class 



Berkstresser, Emory 
Blackwelder, W. D. 
Blake, Preston- 
Boozer, C. D. 
Carson, W. G. 
Chandler, W. W. 
Cunningham, C. 
Dockery, C. J. 
Gaines, J. P. 
Holmes, E. W. 
Huff, J. A. 

ISBELL, J. F. 

Hester, C. H. 
Lanier, M. W. 
Lee, A. S. 
Milford, J. J. 



Mason, D. C. 
Patrick, W. A. 
Pickens, J. D. 
Parker, Earle 
Reid, A. H. 
Ricell, W. R. 
Seals, P. W. 
Simmons, I. F. 
Stivender, J. C. 
Steely, C. J. 

SWINDALL, A. C. 

Thompson, J. D. 
Taylor, S. A. 

TllORNKERRY, J. P. 

Wyatt. T. C. 




In Memoriam 

BEN HILL WALKER, Class of 191 1 
Died August, 1912 

THOMAS WATSON SMYLY, Class of 19 12 
Died June, 1912 

MELTON ARRINGTON HOFFMAN, Class of 191 2 
Died January 18, 191 $ 





Volunteer Missionaries 



Berkstresser, K. 
Thompson, J. D. 



ROLL 

Simmons, I. F. 
Holmes, E. W. 
Mason, D. C. 



Chandler, W. W. 

ISBELL. J. F. 





In Lighter Vein 



Principles upon which the Joke Editors have worked 
Truth is the mother of joy. 
Truth cultivates, ennobles, purifies. 
Criticism is a friend to success. 
A good laugh is worth a hundred groans. 
If you dance you must pay the fiddler. 
What you sow, that must you also reap. 

Lives of students oft remind us, 

We can ride on ponies lean, 
And departing leave behind us, 
Footsteps few and far between. 



CLASS STONES 

Freshman Emerald 

Sophomore Blarney Stone 

JUNIOK Grindstone 

Senior Tombstone 



Four Ages of College 

I. Freshmen in seclusion, 

Writing home for money; 
II. Sophie in the moonlight, 
Talking to his honey; 
III. Junior all importance, 

Thinking of his clothes; 
IV. Senior full of knowledge, 
Thus the college goes. 



Wanted Qric k — Someone to inform Kingry, Thornberry, "Mary" 
Gilmer and others concerning the schedule of the last car leaving town. 



Seven Wonders of Howard College 

1. Tennant's Singing. 

2. "Sticks" Stivender's big words. 

3. "Slick" Tisdale's "caninish" love. 

4. Red Robinson's hair. 

5. Chemical affinity of "R. S." and "J. A." 

6. Gaines' religion. 

7. Thompson's "Titanics" (having reference to his feet). 

Weather Forecast of the Faculty 

Dr. SHELBURNE Settled zicathcr 

Prof. Moon Mild and sunny 

Dr. Macon Pleasant 

Prof. Hendricks Cold waves, probably freezing 

Prof. Olive Lovely, but probably stormy on Fridays 

Prof. Burns Thunderstorms with exceedingly high winds 

Prof. Sarratt Probably agreeable 

Prof. Haggard Continued dry 

Prof. Kelly Uncertain 

Prof. Noojin Probably warmer 

Prof. Dawson "Donner und Blitzer" 



WHY THEY CAME TO COLLEGE 

Garner — They didn't see him before he got here. 

Bradley — To study literature (Red Book and Black Cat). 

Gilmer — To keep boys from studying. 

Carson — No one knows. Came too long ago. 

In. 1. inc. 1 on — To raise standard of Howard College athletics. 

Jones — To look cute. 

Isbell — To let the girls alone. 

Davie — To flirt. 

TeNNANT — To sing for the boys. 

Dunning — To study ? ? ? ? 

Gallant — Not to study. 

Wyatt — To reread "Browning's" love letters. 

STIVENDER — To hand around the Profs. 

I)i NAWAY — To establish a Bureau ot Information. 

MOTLEY — To use the telephone. 

HUFF — To advise the Faculty. 



HENTRE-NQU*I7 



DEFINITIONS 

"Quiz" — Mental assault and battery. 

"BLUFF" — Weapon in case of "quiz." 

"Kiss" — Nothing divided by two. 

"EAVESDROPPER" — A person who hears something someone else has 

no business telling. 
"SPECIAL" — A term that covers a multitude of sins. 
"Study" — A necessary evil. 
"Prof." — An intellectual retail merchant. 
"Chapee" — Resting place for the weary. 
"GENDER" — That which shows whether a man is masculine, feminine 

or neuter. 
"Billet-Doux" — Heart medicine. 
"Copia Yerborum" — Hot air. 

"Hors de Combat" — All in, down and out (Monday morning). 
"Finis" — The last drop in the bucket. 
"Passus SUMIAM" — Pass us some jam. 



LATE OR EARLY? 

East Lake Father — Daughter, will you give that college boy a mes- 
sage to-night when he calls? 

Daughter — Yes, father. 

Father — Tell him that we have no objections to his running up the 
gas bills, but that we'd rather he wouldn't carry away the morning paper 
when he leaves. 

ONCE, BUT ENOUGH 

COMPTON (on the Tidewater) — How often do you kill a man on this 
line? 

CONDUCTOR (smiling) — Just once. 

DID HE, OR NOT? 

Mrs. Harris — Quit that pulling my cat's tail ! 

TAYLOR — -\ ain't pulling no cat's tail — I'm just holding it and the cat 
is doing the pulling. 

Where, oh Where, Did "Them" Measles Come From, Any- 
way? 



WHAT FOR? 

Prof. Hendricks — Why did you come to college, anyway? You 
are not studying. 

Walker, B. H. — I hardly know myself. Mother says to fit me for 
the presidency; Uncle Bill says to sow my wild oats; Sis says to get a chum 
for her to marry, and Pa says to bankrupt the family. 

SOME RHETORICIAN! 

Wilson (speaking of a train) — She rolled into the station. 
Prof. Burns — Why personify in the feminine gender? 
Wilson — Because it was not a mail train. 

DOCTORING A DOCTOR 

Blake, W. C. — Say, Doctor, did you ever doctor another Doctor? 

Dr. Macon — Oh, yes. 

Blake — Well, tell me this: Does a doctor doctor a doctor the way 
the doctored doctor wants a doctor doing the doctoring doctor the other 
doctor in his own way? 



of? 



OUT OF THE MOUTHS OF BABES 

Prof. Noojin — Who can tell me what "don't" is the abbreviation 



Dunning — Doughnut. 

Prof Burns — Tell all you can about Longfellow. 

Chandler — Longfellow was born in Portland, Maine, while his 
parents were traveling in Europe. 

Prof. Haggard — Name the zones and describe each. 

Cunningham — There are three zones, masculine, feminine and 
neuter. The masculine is either temperate or intemperate; the feminine 
is either torpid or frigid; while the neuter is somewhat "lukewarm." 

Dr. Macon — What is a veterinary surgeon? 

Hand — A doctor for old soldiers. 

PROF. Bckns — Where was the scene of "As You Like It" laid? 

Howell — In the Garden of Eden. 

Prof. Dawson — Give the principal parts of the verb "schicken." 

WATSON — Wing, backbone, and gizzard. 



Druggist — What will you take? 

GAINES — A dope with "corroborated" water in it. 

Prof. Birns — What is the lesson for to-day? 
THORNBERRY — Tennyson's "In Memorandum." 

Prof. Hendricks — What was "Simony?" 
Causey — The reign of Simon. 

Prof. Olive — What is a vacuum? 

NEWMAN — A vacuum is a large, empty space in which the Pope lives. 

TlSDALE — I thought you had "Trig" last year. 
JORDAN — I did, hut Sarratt "encored" me. 

Prof. Olive — What would you put in a diamond ring that you were 
ahout to present to a young lady? 
Carson — Her finger. 

Tate stood outside Huff's door, while he stood hefore the mirror, 
hrush in hand, smilingly surveying his beautiful image, and this is what 
Pate heard : 

"Oh, you little cutie; Oh, you sweet t'ing; 

Oh, you 'purty' kid, I see you." 

NeIGHBOK — How is your boy getting along in school? 
Mrs. ROBINSON — Oh, just fine. He is quarterback on the football 
team and full back in his studies. 

Pow i;i. l— Don't you think these glasses give me a very intelligent 
appearance? 

MONCRIEF — Yes; aren't they strong! 



COLLEGE PREACHERS 

Mr. A. — Did you hear the Rev. J. Calvin Stivender preach to-day? 
Mr. B. — No. He grunted this morning. He said he'd preach to- 
night. 

Wyatt's favorite themes for sermons: 

i. "Old Mozes." 2. "Old Petter." 3. "Old Pall." 4. "Old 
Felux." 

Thornberry's theme and text on March 9, 1 9 1 3 : 

1. Theme — Woodrow Wilson. 

2. Text — "And I shook hands with him." Found in the twenty- 

fourth book (year) of my experience, and first verse (trip 
to Washington) . 

Dr. SHELBURNE — Who is the most old-timy and country-like preach- 
.r in the class? 

The Class (in concert) — "John Jim" Milford. 

Dr. SHELBURNE — Who, then, is his fellow comrade? 

The Class (with more enthusiasm) — "Bill Dick" Rigell. 



CARSON ON "STICKABILITY" 

Now, suppose a hen sits on a dozen eggs for two long weeks and 
quits. Them eggs won't be worth two cents a carload. But if she had 
stucken to her post for three weeks, there would have been fifteen or 
twenty fine chickens hatched off. 

Holmes' Telegram — Am sick and have no money. 

Father's Reply — Am well and have plenty. 

WYATT (lovingly) — You are the breath of my life. 
Miss B. — Then why don't you hold your breath? 



DUNSMORE ON CHEWING GUM 

The East Lake Drug Company keeps the best gum I ever saw. I 
bought some down there and chewed it for three weeks, and it wasn't 
worn out even then. 

Prof. Sarratt — And how do you like married life? 
Prof. Burns (sighing) — Well — er — it's no political job. 

Chief of Fire Department — Hurry up and save that boy. 
Fireman — I'll have Jones on the ladder in a minute — I'm waiting 
for him to comb his hair. 

McCary — I'm going to the city when I'm graduated. 
Blake — What do you intend to do there? 
McCary — Be cashier for an organ grinder. 
Blake — Huh, you haven't a thing on me. 
McCary — Well, what are you going to do? 
Blake — Be engineer on a peanut stand. 

"Rube" Robertson, in a little confab with his girl, said: "If I am 
pretty, I don't go about telling folks about it." 

Prof. Moon, in speaking of colors, said: 
"I'm especially fond of grey." 

Prof. Kelly — Do you mean the Confederate Grey of the South? 
Prof. Moon (joyfully) — No, I don't. I mean the beautiful "Gray" 
of the Barrett School. 

Tell me, Oh, tell me, if you can, 
Has anybody heard that pan. 
I'm just as hungry as I can be, 
Got in this morning at half-past three. 



Cluha 









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fc3> *1».\ "« 


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Doctors' 


Club 




MEMBERS 




Blake, W. C. Fullington 


KlNGRY 


Blake, T. A. Gilder 




C \L SEY 


COMPTON (Horse Doctor) GLASS 




South 


Cook. \Y. J. GARNER 




Tisdale 


Davie Hand 




\\" \rd. J. A. 


Dunning Howell 




Ward, R. S 




Fighter's Club 



Motto: Might makes right 



Flower: Samson weed 



Colors: Black and Blue 



FRATER IN FACULTATE 
"Dick" Kelly, Chief Demonstrator 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Stodghill Davie Kin cry 

Cook Ferguson (Gip the Blood) Acton. \Y. D. (Speedy 

Tisdale Williams Boy) 

Duke, Curtis Glass Faru\ 

Rich 




Pie Club 



FuLLIN'GTON 

Motley 



EATERS 

Harris 
Gilder 

HONORARY 
Arthur Amenolikastoron 



Rowan 

N I WMAN 




I 



MARENGO 









County Clubs 






CHILTON 




DlJNSMORE 


Olive 


Reynolds 


Glass 


Mullins 
Bradley — "Been there" 

MARENGO 


Robinson 


Boozer 


COMPTON 

Dunning 
GENEVA 


Hasty 


Rigell 


Ward. I. A. 
Ward, R. S. 


Watson 




Show Club 



Prof. Dawson 
Prof. Sarratt 
Prof. Noojin 
Robertson 
Gilmer 

ISBELL 

Mlllins 



Newman 
Motley 
Ten n ant 
Huff 

Y ANN 

Robinson 



Stivender 

dunsmore 

Simmons 

Gilder 

Blake 

C \lsev 



The Best Time to Go: If Inn you have the price 




Inaugural Club 



Davie 
IIelly, R. I}. 



Kelly, S. B. 
Thornberry 
Blake, \V. C. 



Duke 

Rich 




Name It! 




"Red" Club 

Reynolds Strawberry 

Robinson- . . Kinky 

Ramsey Brick Bat 

Howell . . Li«ht 

Bradley Vermillion 

Ford Sandy 

MULLINS /.:<'/// Headed 



L 




Disfigured Club 



'Three Fingered" Gilder 'Stiff Arm" Newman "Four Toed" Dunning 

'Cush Foot" Tennant "Hook Fingered" Vice "Club Foot" Jones 

Hopety Hugh" McCary "Limber Leg" FULLINGTON 



AN IRISH FAIRY TALE 

By Nan G. Walshe 

Pat O'Hara was the pride of the country side. As we say over in 
Ireland, he was "a broth of a boy." Tall and strong, with bewitching 
grey eyes and dark close-cropped brown hair, a hearty laugh and a heart- 
breaking smile, Pat had what we of the Emerald Isle call "a way with him," 
and with his kindly words and sparkling wit he installed himself as the pride 
and joy of every heart in the parish of Gleneven. Old and young, grave 
and gay — Pat was a favorite with all of them, and many a whispered 
"God bless you" came from the lips of the old folks, and many a sigh 
went up from the hearts of the fair colleens, as they watched Pat shoulder 
his pitchfork or rake and go to the fields, or saunter down the village 
street with his beloved fiddle under his arm. Pat was indeed the pride of 
the parish. Never a fair was complete without him, and the dances at 
the crossroads in the moonlight fell dull and flat if Pat's hearty laugh 
did not ring out, if his witty sayings were not heard; above all, if the 
sweet strains from Pat's violin did not fill the night air with music and 
joy and happiness. 

(Continued on page 151) 



JEFFERSON 

STANDARD LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

STRONGEST IN THE SOUTH TOR THE WORLD 
STRONGEST IN THE WORLD TOR THE SOUTH 



By insuring your life in a Southern Company with Strength, Safety, and 
Absolute Security is the perfect consummation of patriotism and sound judgment. 

Old Line Policies that say what they mean and mean what they say. The 
General Agents for this Company are all old Howard Men. 



A. D. SMITH & COMPANY 

GENERAL AGENTS FOR AL4BAMA 

210-211 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 



NO MATTER 
WHAT YOUR 



A BUSINESS EDUCATION 
IS ESSENTIAL, 



TARHEELER training broadens and 
develops your business instincts. 
It will make you more practical; better 
able to cope with the many puzzling 
commercial problems which come into 
every man's life, whether he be a busi- 
ness or a professional man. 

A Wheeler Course is necessary to your 
success. Write for our 1913 catalogue. 



BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 



1909 2 TO 1917'., FIRST AVE. 






cc 





^orirty Srattfi (WotljfH 

CLOTHING, HATS, FURNISHINGS 
SHOES 

COLLEGE CHAPS ARE CLOTHES 
CONNOISSEURS 



That would be enough reason to trade here. 
But Blach's offer the additional attraction of great 
big money savings, because here everybody pays 
cash. When you see the values you will also see 
why they prefer to do so. 




Third Avenue at 19th Street 

BIRMINGHAM 



Copyright by AKred Decker & Kohn 



Therein lies the reason for Pat's popularity. He could play the 
violin like an angel, and when he put his whole soul into the work and 
drew forth from the strings the sad, plaintive tones of the songs and la- 
ments of his native land, he could, as the old cronies of the parish said, 
"draw tears from a stone;" and who would expect the feet of the light- 
hearted maidens and youths of Erin to remain still when Pat chose to 
set them going with his airy jigs and reels and whirling melodies. But 
once upon a time, as the children say, Pat had a very remarkable experi- 
ence, which even heightened his popularity and made him more sought 
after than ever, hut which nearly cost him his life. 

The day was at last drawing to a close and one by one the people 
rode, drove or walked away, some in their carts, some in their Irish 
jaunting cars, ami others who lived not tar from the town, walking home 
in happy laughing groups. 

1 C ontinued on page 1^2) 



Not Only Books 
That You Study 



But 




Books That You Lov< 

Your Book is in 
The Book Store of 



Loveman, Joseph The World's Best 

jgf LjOeb I Sold in Birmingham only by 

Birmingham j SealS PiailO CO., 

Birmingham ] 



2017 First Ave. 



Pat was almost the last one to leave Carrickross. He had so many 
friends that he had a hard time tearing himself away and, as, by the end 
of the day, Pat was feeling in rather good spirits, he did not realize how 
time, which waits for no man, was fleeing, and already night had come 
clown on the weary world. 

Finally Pat had his "wee deoch and durrish" (last drink, at the door), 
and with his beloved instrument under his arm, he started on the way to 
Gleneven. He had no difficulty in finding the road, though he seemed to 
have some little difficulty in keeping to one side of it. The gentle moon 
shone overhead, and thousands of twinkling stars shone round her like 
myriads of fairy lamps lighting her on her way. A soft breeze sighed 
through the trees that lined the road on either side, and tanning the 
heated temples of the young fiddler, they cooled his hot brow and helped 
him to regain his senses, which he had never completely lost. 

Pat had worked hard all day, fiddling tor the young people, and 
dancing with the pretty colleens now and then, when some less competent 
player took his place for a little while. Now he was tired, and even as 
he walked along his weary eyelids grew heavy with sleep, and it required 

(Continued on page 154) 



J. IFkdman & (h. 



(ITERS 



1908 FIRST AVt. 

IRMINGMAM.ALA. 



Spiro Hardware Company 
"The Stove M en" 

Not only sells the BEST of everything for the kitchen, but 
handles a good line of athletic and sporting goods, too 

Baseball, Football and Lawn Tennis Supplies 

1920 Third Ave. Special prices to College boys Birmingham 



The Birmingham 
Ledger 



Clean, Fearless 
Independent 

— and stands for the public 

Chris's Place 

1926 FIRST AVE. 

CHRIS COLIAS. Proprietor 

Open Dag and Night 

The best eatab'es the market affords. 
Phone Main 3962 



WE- 



will appreciate your 
patronage 

YOU — 



will appreciate our serv- 
ice 



Excelsior 

Laundry 

Phone Main 222 

Birmingham, Alabama 



son* «e*v A r*iet 

ALWAV^ STMHtS 
MF VPon r\Y 

■ y PLA<F, 




Littlf Champ 

WHO AHF you i 








Oxford and Holman 
Bibles and Testaments 
Nelson's Revised Bibles 

Engraved Cards 
School Announcements 

Wedding Invitations 



| SCHOOL SUPPLIES— Black- 
boards, Crayons, Erasers, Maps, 
Charts, Globes, Flags, Inks, Tab- 
lets, Pencils, Report Cards, 
School Registers, Mechanical 
Drawing Sets and Supplies. 



! I'M THE X 

Coy THATm the) 

lACHE in £AST LAHej 




Dewberry & 

Montgomery 

Stationery 

Company 



2014 Second Ave. 



B'HAM, ALA. 



the utmost effort for him to drag his feet from step to step. Nature, 
at length, demanded rest and restoration of energy, and when Pat came 
to the Gurth-na-ree crossroads, he gently laid aside his fiddle and, throw- 
ing himself on the green bank by the roadside, he soon went fast asleep. 

What was that exquisite sound he heard? Whence came that beauti- 
ful harmony that struck upon his ears? Had he died and was this the 
heavenly choir to which he was listening? What earthly fiddler could draw 
such soft, sweet tones from a violin? 

Slowly Pat came back to consciousness, and to his brain came the 
confusion of ideas brought by the exquisite music of a violin, played, he 
knew not where nor by whom. Fearful of disturbing and so bringing the 
concert to a close, Pat moved slowly and quietly till he at least reached a 
sitting posture. Then, and not until then, did the idea dawn upon his 
brain. 

( ontinued on page [55) 



"Sure, it's the good people (fairies) I'm hearing. 'Tis the fairy 
music I'm after listening to," said Pat to himself. "Sure it's lucky I am 
entirely, to have such a chance to hear the 'ceoil shee' (fairy music)." 

Entranced with the sounds, Pat sat there listening, drinking in the 
soft, sweet music made by the fairy fiddler, and storing away in his 
brain the fairy melody; with his anxiety to try it allayed only by the fear 
of disturbing the "good people" and destroying the pleasure of their 
nightly revels. 

On and on they danced, in and out and round about, and still they 
played and laughed and sang in all their fairy beauty and loveliness. 
Utterly bewitched by the scene, Pat sat on as in a dream, watching the little 
green patch in the middle of the crossroads, which served as the fairies' 
pleasure-ground, ball-room and concert-hall all in one. 

Just as the light of the dawning day appeared in the east, gaily the 
little fairies danced off to their homes in the hearts of the flowers, and the 
last strains of the soul-bewitching melody died away on the morning 
breeze. The fairies sleep in the swaying flowers, through the glaring 
light of day to refresh themselves for the nightly gambols of the midnight 
festivals. 

(Continued on page 159) 



Established 1885 



THE 

Jefferson County 
Savings Bank 

Corner 21st St. and 2d Ave. 

Capital, Surplus and Profits 

$300,000.00 

E. F. Enslen, Pres. 

Chas. E. Thomas, Vice-Pres. 
Wm. C. Sterrett, Cashier 

Wm. D. Enslen, Asst. -Cashier 

DIRECTORS 
Christian F. Enslen James A. Downey 
Eugene F. Enslen Chas. E. Thomas 
T. F. Wimherly S. P. King 
Geo. W. Harris Samuel Rich 
W. D. Wood 

Does a General Banking Business 
Allows 4% Interest on Savings 
and Time Deposits 

Your Bunk Business Invited 

1 


WARNERS 
ICECREAM 


DRINKS p J 
L CIGARS ' 
1 TOBACCO I 
L FRUITS L 
L PUNCH 

\ Agency for A t 
Norris' Candies 
K n \ 
_^ Orders Taken U J 

" For Cream 

S 7634 1st Ave. L | 

Phone 14 


THE BEST 


Quality Workmanship J 
Satis/action 

THOMAS L. BECKMAN 
COMPANY 
College and School 
Engravers Stationers 
Printers Jewelers 

827-29 Filbert PHILADELPHIA 
Street PKNN. 

j 




Headquarters for Everything 

Athletic 



Baseballs 

Bicycles 
Masks 



Tennis Equipment 

Fishing Tackle 

Football Goods 

Protectors 

Complete Outfits for all kinds of Sports 



Uniforms 
Bats 
Gloves 



LARGEST SPORTING GOODS HOUSE IN ALABAMA. AGENTS 
FOR A. J. REACH'S FAMOUS BASEBALL AND FOOTBALL GOODS 



Birmingham Arms & Cycle Company 

1919 Third Avenue, Birmingham, Ala. 



Earle Brothers I Little Gem Cafe 



92 



Wholesale 
Grocers 



9S 

1801-03 First Avenue 
BIRMINGHAM 



GATSIS & PAPPAS, Proprietors 

Meals Served on Short Notice 

221 North 19th Street 

Open Day and Night 

Marble Barber Shop 

In The Florence 



H. C. HARRIS, Proprietor 
Hot and Cold Baths, Fourteen Barbers 
1828 Second Ave. Birmingham, Ala. 



t 




E. G. Burchfiel 



DRUGGIST 



WE handle the most 
complete line of High 
Grade Stationery, 
Soaps, and Toilet Req- 
uisites in East Lake. 



We Appreciate the 
College Trade 




HOOD & WHEELER 

Sell furniture that "stands the 
saw test" and "lasts-a-lifetime." 
The store stands behind every sale. 

EXCHANGE YOUR OLD FURNITURE 

FOR NEW. WE ALLOW 

FULL VALUE. 



Hood & Wheeler Furniture Co., 
2012-14 3d Ave. 

Established 1887 

COLLINS & COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS and 
PRODUCE MERCHANTS 



Sole Agents SNOWFLAKE FLOUR 



2301 First Ave. 2300 Morris Ave. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



Colrell & Leonard 

Albany. N. Y. 
Makers of 

CAPS and GOWNS 
To the American Col- 
leges from the Atlantic 
to the Pacific. 

CLASS CONTRXCTS 
A SPECIALTY. 



ELECTRICAL 
GOODS 



Walker- 

Middlebrooks 

Company 

313 N. 19th St . 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 



WEBB BOOK COMPANY 
2010 Second Ave. 

A place "Bookish" at all times. 

If it's Bibles. Testaments. Gift Books. Library 
Books. Books for Boys and Girls, Books for Chil- 
dren—any Book you think of. Fountain Pens, 
School Supplies, Fine Stationery. Blank Books 
—then see o' write us. We supply agents, 
wholesale and retail. Our 25c and 50c Books 
are great winner*. 



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THE "ZOO" 



Chained by pleasureable wonder, Pat stayed rooted to the spot for 
some minutes, then with a happy cry he eagerly snatched up his violin and 
began to play the fairy music. Slowly and with faltering tone it came at 
first, but he played it again and again, until at last the soft, sweet tones 
of the fairy melody floated out, and Pat was a happy boy. 

Yes, Pat was happy as long as he was satisfied with playing the 
first part of the tune. But he was so charmed with his success that he 
must needs have all the melody. In vain he tried to play the second 
part. Always the cunning intervals eluded him, and he could not master 
it. For a time, however, he rested content with the first part of the beauti- 
ful fairy melody, and people who had heretofore been charmed with Pat's 
playing, were fairly enchanted with his music now. The young people 
praised and applauded and skipped and danced when Pat played f '''' 
"ceoil shee." But the old folks sighed and shook their heads, and 
whispered to each other that no good would come of it. 

"The 'good people' won't be liking it at all, at all," said the old 
women among themselves, and the old men would say to each other sadly, 
"Sure it's a great pity entirely that such a fine gossoon should be so taken 
up with the fairy music." 

It was a great pity indeed, for Pat gave up everything to the one 
desire he now had — to play the second part of the fairy tune. Night, 
noon, and morning, he sat and played and played, but always at the same 

( Continued on page [62) 




Q 



TRY 

ROLLER CHAMPION 
FLOUR 

THE FLOUR THE BEST COOKS USE 

W. M. COSBY FLOUR & GRAIN 

COMPANY 

Agents 

BIRMINGHAM 



"TO YOU COLLEGE CHAPS" 

LOOK NIFTY 
BUY YOUR CLOTHES FROM 

SAKS 

SUITS AT $18 TO $40 
LOUIS SAKS CLOTHING CO. 

BIRMINGHAM 



fto"Rvm ' j «/v» 







Foolish QuBsTtons II* iOOOj 



EAST LAKE DRUG 
COMPANY 

A. A. BOLEN, Prop. 

We carry a full line of drugs, 
soaps, perfumes, toilet articles, 
stationery, cigars, tobaccos, and 
in fact, everything you would ex„ 
pect to find in a well-equipped 
and up-to-date Drug Store. 

SOFT DRINKS 

Our first aim is the satisfac- 
tion of our customers. 

EAST LAKE DRUG 
COMPANY. 



The 

Spalding 

Trade 

Nark 



Won't win the game for yon, but the 
Trade Mark on your TENNIS REQUI- 
SITES assures you of the best help possi- 

6 A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

74 North Broad St. ATLANTA, GA. 

Catalogue Free 



William H. Watson's 

Pictures, Stories, Lectures, Dramas 



"The consensus of press opinion of boih 
continents, speaking eloquently of Dr. Wat- 
son's work, is that he is a master of art 
and literature. Highly instructive, illumi- 
nating and very wondrous books. Each 
picture a work of Art." 

Art School Publishing Co. 

2317 Michigan Avenue, Chicago, U.S.A. 




point in the melody all memory <>t the second part of the tune would fade 
from his mind, and all his attempts to recall it were in vain. 

Then Pat gave way to despair. Slowly, hut surely, his health began 
to tail, and the once strong and stalwart man became a thin, emaciated 
wreck of humanity, and the people's hearts grew sad, for Pat no longer 
played the sad songs, or the merry lilting jigs and reels of his native land. 
Day in and day out he played only the fairy tune, forever trying to recall 
the second part of the melody he had heard on the night of the Carrick- 
ross fair. The wise old folks slowly wagged their heads and said "It is 
the curse of the fairies coming on him. He is going away in a decline. 
The fairies have put it on him because he tried to learn their music." 
And so everyone in Gleneven believed, and nothing but pity and sympathy 
were felt for Pat, once the pride and joy of the parish, now a worn-out 
specimen ot humanity. 

Pat could stand it no longer. He would go once more and hear the 
fairy music, though he knew that the good people did not like the mortals 
to interfere with their revels. 






(Continued on page 165) 



Phone Main 4164 

ARMSTRONG HAT CO.. 
HATTERS AND 
HABERDASHERS 



117 N. 20ih STREET 

BIRMINGHAM. - - ALA. 



ANDREW COLIAS 

Wholesale and Retail Confec- 
tioner and Manufacturer of 
Home-Made 

Chocolates. Bonbons and Ice Cream 

Phone Main 1137 

1st Ave. and 21st Street 

BIRMINGHAM, - ALA. 



THE PLACE TO GET YOUR 

High Class Printing 

! COLLEGE ANNUALS, Pro- 

grams. Invitations, Visiting Cards 
and Office Stationery. 

AMERICAN PRINTING CO. 

22nd St. Bridge and Morris Ave. 
BIRMINGHAM. 



W. D. COLBY 

DECORATING 

COMPANY 

WALL PAPER 

DRAPERIES 

RUGS 

1922 Third Avenue 




E. E. Forbes Piano 
Company 



If you are in the market for a 
good Piano, come to see us. 
Here is our line: 

Chickering, Bush &l. Gerts, 
French &_> Sons, Forbes, 
Kranich &, Bach, Lawson, 
Jesse French. 

Complete stock of Victrolas 
and Records. 



E. E. Forbes Piano Co. 

1909 Third Avenue, BIRMINGHAM 



Sp< 



B 



encer Business 



Coll 



ege 



Why such a rush to Spencer's? 

Because the business world indorses our work. 

Because nearly every Bank and Railway Office in the City bears testimony 

to the success of our pupils. 
Because we have good things to teach and know how to teach them. 
Because over 500 positions have been rilled with our pupils during the 

past two years. 
Because SPENCERIAN SHORTHAND has no equal. 
Because many young people have, after a few weeks study of our system 

of Shorthand and Bookkeeping, risen from $4.00 to $5.00 weekly salary 

to positions at $40.00 to $175.00 per month. 
Time required to complete either course, 4 to 10 weeks. 



Prof. S. A. Ellis, Pres., Birmingham, Ala. 






That very night saw Pat at Gurth-na-ree waiting for the fairy festival 
to begin. On the stroke of midnight they came dancing from their flower- 
homes, singing, laughing and capering over the green grass. Once more 
Pat's heart bounded as he listened again to the exquisite strains that had 
captured his fancy. Anxious to impress the tune on his memory, Pat 
went nearer and nearer, till he found himself in the middle of the fairy 
ring. He was seized with a mortal dread, lest the "good people" would 
be angry with him and do him some deadly harm. But lo ! and behold! 
they kept on dancing and singing around him for some time, until Pat was 
astonished and bewildered. 

Suddenly the dancing ceased, the fairies begged Pat to sit down 
while they talked with him. Down he sat, and the fairies clambered all 
over him, as the little fairy fiddler began speaking. "Pat O'Hara," he 
said, "sure, you're a fine fiddler, but you can't be playing the ceoil shee. 
You'll be after stopping it now, if you please, and if you do you will soon 
be well and strong again." "Sure I'd rather die than give up my fairy 
tune," cried Pat, "but I can't remember the whole of it." "Well, listen 
to me, Pat O'Hara," said the fairy fiddler, "if you will promise not to 
try to remember any more, we will give you leave to play what you now 
know — and you're the first mortal that ever did it. You may play the 
first part, for you play it well, but you never will remember the second 
part. Go now and come back no more." 

Pat was tired, sad and disappointed, but he was thankful to the fairies 
for letting him play part of the "ceoil shee," and he gave up trying to re- 
member the rest. Soon he grew well and strong again, his happy laugh 
rang out through the country side, his ready wit once more made fun 
for others, the fiddle once more gave forth the jigs and reels for the young 
folks, but Pat always loved the fairy tune, and ever afterward he was 
called Pat the Fairy Fiddler. 



Howard College 

Birmingham, Alabama 



SITUATED in the suburbs of a great 
and growing city, enjoying all the 
benefits of the large city; beset by 
none of its evils. 

A place where you can safely send 
your boy. 

Howard is a member of the Ala- 
bama Association of Colleges and has a 
"standard" curriculum. 

The Academy of Howard College pre- 
pares students for entrance into the college. 

Please write for our latest catalogue. 



James M. Shelburne 

President 



Jud 



Coll 



son 

Marion, Alabama 



ege 



This is one of the oldest colleges for 
women in America, and is in first 
rank among educational institutions. 

Standard courses leading to A. B. 
and B. S. Degrees. Exceptionally 
fine advantages are offered in Music, 
Art and Expression. 

Fine~ 3 Athletic equipment. 

Extremely healthy location. 

For illustrated catalogue, address 



Robert G. Patrick 



President 



O- K. Barber Shop 

East Lake 

You are always welcome at the O. K. 
Barber Shop, next door to postoffice. Your 
trade will be appreciated by us. 

First Class "White" Barbers 
P. A. Craw ford 

Proprietor 



Joe Davis & Frank NcRee 

Everything New and Sanitary 

Eleven First Class BARBERS 

Always Pleased to Serve the Public 

First National Bank Barber Shop 

Entrances: On 20th St .--Lobby of Bank 



J. H. ROLL 


HOWARD COLLEGE BOYS 


INTERIOR DECORATOR 

Our specialty: Stage Scenery and all 
kinds of Mural Painting. Mirrors, Picture 
Frames, Artist s Materials, etc. 


AND 

THEIR FRIENDS 

will find the most stylish apparel for men 
at the fairest prices at 


Phone 1283 
2022 First Avenue 

BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 


PORTER'S 

1922-24 First Avenue 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



We are prepared to do 
all kinds of shoe repair- 
ing on short notice. 



Woodlawn Shoe Hospital 

John H. Nunnelley, Prop. 

Fine Shoe Repairing 

Phone 9, Woodlawn 



Old shoes made like 
new while you wait. Your 
patronage solicited. 



The Prices Are Right, Consistent With Good Material 

WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 

5516 FIRST AVENUE 



Jacob Reed's Sons 

Manufacturers of 

Gold Medal Uniforms 

Our equipment and facilities for producing Uni- 
forms for Colleges and Military Schools are un- 
equalled by any other house in the United States. You 
are sure of intelligent and accurate service in order- 
ing of us. The uniforms worn at 

HOWARD COLLEGE 

are finished examples of the character, quality and 
appearance of our product. 

Jacob Reed s Sons 

1424-1426 Chestnut Street PHILADELPHIA 



Johns Undertaking 
Company 



2 

Phone: 



4th Avenue 
Main 1002 




HE INSTITUTION depicted above is, in our opin- 
ion, no small factor in making this publication 
a credit to the Alma Mater of those to whom its 
issue is a work of love. Relatively, as much 
careful thought has been devoted here to the 
material development of the literary and artistic 
ideals of its editors and contributors as she has lovingly bestowed 
upon their mental and moral training. We believe we have done our 
work well, but the printed page has a tongue of its own, and speaks 
no uncertain language to the seeing eye. What does it say to you ? 





Foote & Davies Company 

SPECIALISTS IN EDUCATIONAL PRINTING Atlanta C* C*f\rcr\ci 
AND THE PRACTICE OF GRAPHIC ARTS ivLldllLd, VJcOIgld 




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AT LA5TMY 

S/}YS AT 
HOvJ/\HO 

AHB T CAtl 
-BCCttl THt 

STUDY 
Of 

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WHO /\f\£ YOU? 




fAY RULE Will Be 
TO KILL 0/J (URE 
B17T THE. /AOtlEY 
IAVST (OrAE 5of*)£vmy. 
I win Ot/K,/toi £ 
wmjpfeiV CASE 

>, . .1 A<(*/iB//ri l re> 

^S 1 THE PAT,s AT i 
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I'M THE GUY 
vJHAT Pt^T 7V/£ S£f< 
'" MEVICltiE. 




Peddinghaus 
Photographs 



US 

College Photographs 
Picture Frames 
Artist's Materials 
Kodak Finishing 



2024 FIRST AVENUE 




■«— i— i ■! « ■ ' —-return* —— atf t. ' ■ ■ — » 



Suppose 






Suppose all our worries were done, 

And all our bills were paid, 
Suppose all our battles were won, 

And all our fortunes were made; 
Suppose every heart were gay 

And every wish came true, 
Now what do you suppose we would do, 

To pass the time away ? 

Now, let us set to thinking, working, 
And when years have rolled away, 

May we still remember the sweetness 
Of each golden happy day, 

And know we made the best of each moment 
Before it slipped away. 





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J. R. SADLER & COMPANY 



7620-7622 First Avenue 



(Close to College Station) 



For ten years we have led the procession at East Lake, as dealers in 
Staple and Fancy Groceries. 

Recently, we added a line of Shoes, Dry Goods, and Men's Furnishings 
— including high class tailored clothes A. E. Anderson & Co. . 

We are especially grateful for the generous patronage which the 
College Men have given us since we started this new line. 

It is our purpose to continue to broaden our lines, and improve our 
facilities, so that we may take care of all the reasonable wants of the College 
Students. * 

We solicit your trade, whether you be a "Prep" or a "Post-Graduate" 
whether you need a shoe-lace or a graduating suit. 

If it is in our power to do you a favor — however great or small — 
we will take delight in it. 

A.sk the other men about us. 



Chas. D. Reese 

Manufacturing Jeweler 

College, School and Class 
PINS and RINGS 
Athletic MEDALS and 

TROPHIES 



7 22 Namau St. New York 



W. K. McAdory. Pres. 

W. L. Metcalf. Vice-Pres. and Mgr. 

C. W. Worrell. Sec. and Treas. 

KENTUCKY LIVERY CO. 

(Incorporated; 

Livery and Feed Stables 

Successors to Fies & Sons Livery Department. 
Proper and careful attention given to all ani- 
mals and vehicles. Finest livery in the city. 

Both Phones 466 
216 N. Sixteenth Street 

Birmingham. Ala. 






, X l)U».: -%_ $. iutcL^ / j^a, ch- 





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SAMFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

SCGENLD488125.E519I3 A BfJ 

/ Entre nous / 



1 1 00120592 

Special Collections 

LD 

4881.25 
.E5 
1913 



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